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with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time with obama. the reason why i say it does a little bit, you have to have a conscience when you deal with anything. especially when you make decisions for other people than yourself, you have to have a conscience. w
. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed, quote, global warming has begun, expert tells senate. a quarter century later, dr. hansen and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states that basic scientific observation -- seas are rising, glaciers are disappearing, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. about half of amer
, and that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, huge amount of damage. they have incredible new york city is resilient, and how well they are coming back. i think they got about 95% of their transit operations, rail was particularly hit. almost all of east side lower manhattan tunnels flooded, and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all passengers in the world in new york city. and a hit like that was incredible. i understand mayor bloomberg, we met with yesterday, will be in town today, and we had discussions yesterday about fema, which our committee oversees and also transportation and infrastructure that was hurt. that may be the subject of additional scrutiny by the committee, but today, again, we are focused on looking particularly at amtrak's structural organization. i might also recall that with the last hearing what we'll be doing on the northeast corridor, our
don't realize, there are many more to be licensees that other people realize. in new york, where i am, the number is 28. there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite and what we're doing now, and this is the -- i think innovation of auctions, how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win-win way? and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be brauferts who remain in new york and -- broadcasters who remain in new york and others. there is tremendous opportunity to free up spectrum to promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz in 2003, we had a two-star general who said it's absolutely technologically impossible to do. so again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which they have? >> that's exactly what we're doing. through the notice and comment process, t
ago. this is 15 mets. >> ok. thank you for coming. the senators from york and new jersey are elated with the open discussion allowing for amendments and most importantly the strong bipartisan support for a bill that will give relief from of the storm sandy. we are urging -- we will talk about that more a in a minute at -- we are urging the house to put this on the floor quickly and allow a vote. we are asking speaker banner -- we're asking speaker john maynard to a lull a vote. it would be unconscionable for them to leave without voting on a sandy. the strong bipartisan support read got 12 votes from the republicans. the fact a fair three democrats who could not be here were here, we would have 64 votes on this bill and we spoke of 16. with the three absences, we show how important this bill was. the strong bipartisan vote gives impetus to the bill and says to speaker john boehner, this bill has bipartisan support not only in the senate but the house. do not ignore the needs of the new yorkers, new jersey knights and others who have suffered. we have a desperate situation in new yor
was trying to reach to the public. and he wrote a letter to the editor of new york times. and, at that time, the director of the goddard institute did not appreciate that sort of thing. [laughter] he called a meeting of entire people in the building, you know, more than 100 people coming to -- and he really gave it to steve. and the great -- and the really impressive thing about steve was, you know, he didn't back down. so he -- even at that time, when he's just as around 26 or 27-year-old postdoc, he had the courage to stand up for what he believed in. so he was really a good example of courage of a scientist at a very early age. [applause] so anyway, it's -- for all those things about steve, it is a great honor to get an award in his name. thanks. [applause] >> coming up, george will talks about the relationship between religion and u.s. politics and then a hearing on terrorist abuse of refugee programs. >> tomorrow, we will talk about the latest on the so-called fiscal cliff with the joshua gordon of the concord coalition. that is followed by a look of president obama's second term. our
with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was hosted by the forth sity's john dan center. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale
union and two articles from the ap and the new york times. if i could enter those things into the record, i would appreciate it. i wanted to get your perspectives on this. in your recent report you cite research showing 40% of credit disputes are related to collections, events. before we jump into that piece of it, over all, this issue of the complexity of medical that and resolving it, whether it is a good predictor or whether it should be part of the credit reporting system. >> i appreciate your bringing this issue up. it is definitely a source of concern. the fact that collections items are disputed at high rates is not a surprise. -information's its disputed more often than positive information. we should expect higher rates on collective items. i think you have pointed out in some of your own correspondence over half of collections items about 10 years ago a denture a fed study come from -- in a fed study comes from medical collections items, which is way out of proportion to the role the health-care system plays a in the economy compared to debt. >> is that the federal reserve stud
, even though he was only six, jack was a new york giants fan. in the days to come, many of the classmes will also be laid to rest, victims of this tragedy too terrible to comprehend. 20 little girls and boys, 20 tineie daughters and sons, sisters, brothers, friends and playmates. 20 children will never grow up to learn to drive, go on that first date, or graduate from high school. 26 -- i'm sorry, mr. president -- 20 six and seven-year-olds will never have the chai tons fall in love, get married or have children of their own. noah, jack, charlotte, dylan, madeleine, kath reconciliation bill, chase, jessie, grace, care line, jessica, allison, and james. no words of condolence could possibly ease the pain of families who lost cherished little children. but i hope it's some small comfort that the entire nation mourns with them. my heart, my warm wishes go out to all of those affected by friday's massacre. my thoughts are with the students and faculty of sandy hook who witnessed the violence. newtown and the nation have seen great evil, but we've also seen incredible bravely. in her mine fi
of faith. and goodness i see in people, it comes in many forms. i just came from queen's new york and visited a hurricane victims. but don't have any jobs they're helping their neighbors clean-air yard every saturday, exposing themselves to all kinds of things and doing at because they want to do something for their community. i am compelled to say my goodness, if these people are willing to risk their lives, what can i do to help them? >> thank you. you have given me a perfect segue. i would like to pull the thread of proposing a new idea and the possibility of getting up and running out the bad stuff. one of the things women tend to do is dismiss ourselves. we dispose of our ideas if of the pressures that come in power and say i'm sorry. could you talk about that were times when you faced that where you -- where does that come from? how would you instruct other women to not dismiss their ideas? be >> it depends on the circumstance. but i draw my past experience. knowing i'm making a decision that's not going to sit well with other people or they may not agree with that, based on
the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were traveling across the country. they stopped a long way from las veg
: the next caller is from new york, the democrats' line. good morning. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call and thank you, c-span. i am a widow and at this time my daughter in law and my granddaughter -- i have been supporting them since july of this year. rent, all of the expenses, going to school, etc. would i be able to claim them this year on my taxes? i do not make a big income. i was inquiring if i could claim them or not. guest: i am not giving you any tax advice. i really cannot do that. being able to claim your daughter and your grandchild as a dependent on your taxes depends on a lot of different things, and one of them is are they providing -- are you providing more than half of your support for them? are they living with you? another thing you would need to look at is your daughter making and the income whatsoever even if it is a small job that she has on the side or a part-time job. that would probably make her ineligible to be claimed by you. the irs instructions are very good. you can go online and get last year's instructions because the rules are not goin
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12